Vietnam Hosts Baguette Baking Contest for Enthusiasts

The Baguette competition is a chance for passionate bakers in Vietnam to express their artistry and ability, as well as to celebrate the bond of friendship between Vietnam and France.

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professional bakers, students, and enthusiasts,  We are delighted to invite you to participate in the Baguette Prizes of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the diplomatic relations between France and Vietnam.
Professional bakers, students, and enthusiasts, are invite to participate in the Baguette Prizes of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the diplomatic relations between France and Vietnam.

The French Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City, Business France, the French Trade and Investment Agency, and the French Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Vietnam (CCIFV) have recently announced the commencement of a Baguette-making competition. Participants have the opportunity to showcase their skills and demonstrate their proficiency in the art of baking the iconic French bread.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Vietnam and France, and to commemorate the occasion, a series of events have been held.

The competition is open to all professional bakers, students, and even amateurs.

This event presents an unparalleled chance to display the creative flair and enthusiasm of the contestants for baking, while rejoicing in the bond between the two countries.

The organizers have chosen to make the contest rules fairly straightforward in order to provide participants with the utmost freedom to express their creativity with the baguette. Contestants are encouraged to create a unique baguette that reflects their own personal style and skillset. The criteria for judging will be based on concept, aesthetics, and flavor.

Chef Guillaume Gomez, the personal representative of the President of the French Republic for gastronomy, will be presiding over the jury, a testament to the significance that France places on promoting French gastronomy in Vietnam. His presence serves as a reminder of the importance of French gastronomy in the country.

The three winners of the contest will not only receive a certificate from the French Consule Générale, but also the chance to receive training in Singapore at Lesaffre’s bakery center. This one-of-a-kind opportunity will enable the individuals to explore new approaches and hone their baking abilities.

Once you complete the form, you will be entered into the contest. To increase your chances of winning, make sure to share your entry on social media.

The deadline for registration is May 12th.

In 1970, there were 55,000 artisanal bakeries (one for every 790 residents) compared with 35,000 today (one for every 2,000), often in favour of baguettes produced industrially
In 1970, there were 55,000 artisanal bakeries (one for every 790 residents) compared with 35,000 today (one for every 2,000), often in favour of baguettes produced industrially. Photo: Unsplash

The baguette – a seemingly timeless feature of French life – was only officially given its name in 1920 when a new law was passed setting out its minimum weight (80 grams) and maximum length (40 centimetres).

The rest of the history surrounding the modern-day loaf of bread is rather uncertain. Some believe that long loaves had already become common by the 18th century, while others argue that it was not until Austrian baker August Zang introduced steam ovens in the 1830s that the loaf of bread we know today truly began to take shape.

One well-known story is that Napoleon commanded bread to be made in thin sticks that could be more conveniently carried by soldiers.

The construction of the Paris metro in the late 19th century had a significant connection with baguettes, as they were seen as a convenient way to divide food among the workers without having to resort to using knives, which could lead to arguments. Furthermore, baguettes were easy to tear apart, making them an ideal choice for the task.

The event, which was organized by the USAPEEC, aimed to promote the use of U.S. chicken among Vietnamese consumers. It featured a tailored seminar for catering and foodservice professionals, as well as a cooking contest for university students.

The seminar focused on the advantages of using U.S. chicken, such as its safety, quality, and sustainability, and discussed how to use U.S. chicken in various dishes. During the cooking contest, the students showcased their culinary skills by creating unique dishes using U.S. chicken.

At the end of the event, the USAPEEC awarded the top three contestants with prizes. Nguyen Thi Thuy, the first place winner, was presented with a cash prize of US$500. The second and third place winners received US$300 and US$100 respectively.

This contest brought together four highly skilled and experienced judges: Chef Norbert Ehrbar, Iron Chef Le Xuan Tam, Chef Doan Van Tuan, and Chef Tran Thanh Huy, along with 28 teams and 28 delectable and visually stunning dishes.

Born in Switzerland, Chef Norbert is a renowned member of the World Master Chef Society and Co-Founder of the Saigon Professional Chefs’ Guild. Through his dedication and dedication to his craft, he has been working tirelessly to bring Vietnamese cuisine to the international stage.

Hannah Nguyen