This move has elicited conflicting feedback, with some being positive and some negative. It is clear that many people have different opinions on the matter.

Le Van Toan, from Nghe An Province in north-central Vietnam, was visiting a relative in Cu M’Gar District in Dak Lak Province when he arrived. He had traveled to the area to reconnect with his family and explore the region. During his time there, he was able to gain a better understanding of the culture and customs of the local people, as well as enjoy the natural beauty of the area. He also had the opportunity to meet with other members of his extended family, further deepening his connection to the region. All in all, Toan’s visit was a meaningful and enriching experience that he will remember for many years to come.

Taken to the Buon Don Tourist Center, he was eagerly anticipating an opportunity to ride an elephant.

Having paid the VND40,000 (US$1.69) ticket fee, he was dismayed to discover that the service had been discontinued.

According to the current policy, tourists who have purchased tickets to the Buon Don Tourist Center must buy an additional ticket if they want to take a photograph with the tamed elephants.

“I came here to try riding the elephants,” said Toan angrily. “I could have easily watched them elsewhere – but this was a different experience.”

Toan’s companions attempted to bargain with the tour guide, taking into account the lengths the man had gone to get his only opportunity to ride the enormous creature.

He traversed almost one thousand kilometers to arrive here. If you desire, we can offer additional payment. All you need to do is get him to sit on the elephant’s neck and take a picture,” suggested one of his friends.

“What a preposterous service! We have already paid for the entrance ticket, and now you’re suggesting that we pay even more just to take a photograph with the elephant?”

Dung, the tour guide working at the Buon Don Tourist Center, provided the best explanations she could, attempting to placate the incensed visitors.

According to her, the elephant rides were still available until February 10th, when they were officially brought to an end.

Unaware tourists often experience disappointment when they’re unable to ride the elephants, according to her.

According to an elephant keeper at the Buon Don Tourist Center, only a few photography tickets are sold each day.

As the owner’s meager income does not allow for extra expenses, their elephants do not get additional food rations.

Every night, I must tie my elephant in the forest, fearful that it might damage people’s crops. Even worse, there is a possibility that its tail or tusks could be stolen away,” he remarked.

I returned the elephant to the center at the crack of dawn, yet here it is 3:00 pm and I still haven’t sold a single ticket.

Unite to Safeguard Elephants with Joint Efforts

The majestic and beloved elephant is facing a serious threat to its existence due to poaching and environmental degradation. To prevent these gentle giants from extinction, it is essential that we join forces to safeguard them.

One of the most effective ways to conserve elephants is to raise awareness and promote responsible tourism. By educating people on the importance of protecting the species, as well as supporting sustainable tourism initiatives, we can ensure that the elephants remain safe.

We can also help to protect the elephants by engaging in anti-poaching efforts. This involves monitoring poaching activities, collaborating with law enforcement, and using technology to identify poachers. In addition, providing locals with alternative sources of income can help reduce the demand for ivory.

Finally, conserving the habitats of elephants is critical for their survival. This means preserving their food sources, such as grasslands and forests, and protecting them from human-induced threats, such as fire and habitat loss.

By taking action now, we can make sure that future generations can continue to enjoy the beauty of these incredible animals. Let’s come together and make joint efforts to protect the elephants.

Aware of the elephant owner’s disappointment, a group of Hanoians tourists graciously offered to buy five tickets to pose with his beloved pet.

The 40-year-old mammal devoured two packs of sugarcane sticks in a matter of minutes. He chomped through them with remarkable speed, savoring every sweet morsel.

Three extra packs of sugarcane sticks were procured for him by one of these people. And everyone had a great time interacting with the amiable creature.

They took turns to strike a pose with the elephant to avoid potential agitation and hostility.

“Why are you eating so quickly?” asked Hoa, a 60-year-old tourist, as she fed sugarcane sticks to the elephant. “Take it easy! There’s still plenty left. You must have been so hungry for days!”

The elephant was filled with joy as it watched a group of tourists showered it with love and affection, especially with their delectable treats.

It was leaning forward, extending its trunk to grasp the snack.

Those who could capture the awe-inspiring moment of the elephant displaying its immense strength against the azure sky were overcome with joy and found themselves bursting into laughter.

Le Duc Huy, the director of Simexco Daklak Ltd., acknowledged that riding elephants has been the tradition among Vietnamese tourists visiting this area.

“The best thing here has always been to take an elephant ride and bring home a nice photo as a memento. However, if this practice continues, the elephants will become severely stressed,” he cautioned.

This needs to be changed.

According to him, this tourist destination is renowned for its heroic acts and historic legends. Those who visit are filled with admiration for the incredible stories of bravery and courage this place has to offer. From the ancient tales of kings and warriors to the stories of modern-day heroes, this destination will leave you inspired and awestruck.

Occupied by ethnic Lao people since its very early stages, the land of Laos features plenty of captivating stories about hunting and taming elephants. These tales of bravery and skill are still shared among the Lao people, inspiring generations with their heroic feats. From the courage of the hunters to the wisdom of the trainers, these stories showcase the unique culture and traditions of Laos. With the help of these tales, the legacy of a proud history is kept alive.

A group of tourists from central Vietnam showed their excitement as they switched from riding elephants to posing with them at the Buon Don Tourist Center. The photo, taken by Trung Tan of Tuoi Tre, captures the joy of the moment and the beauty of the tourist center. Visitors to the center can have a unique experience, interacting with and taking pictures of elephants. It’s no wonder that these visitors were so delighted to be there!

A group of tourists from central Vietnam show excitement at the switch from riding elephants to posing with them at the Buon Don Tourist Center in Dak Lak Province. Photo: Trung Tan / Tuoi Tre

Along the majestic Srepok River, a major tributary of the Mekong River, lies Dak Lak Province. Here, you can find a river that is filled with beauty and peace, lined with numerous waterfalls and river islands. Soak in the stunning views of this majestic river and its picturesque natural wonders!

Tourists visiting this area can marvel at the majestic banyan trees, whose branches hang like shimmering locks of hair cascading down to the glistening surface of the water.

These features are highly attractive to both local and international travelers alike.

However, the Simexco Daklak Ltd. encountered various difficulties after acquiring the Buon Don Tourist Center.

Noticeably, it is based on over hectares of farmland rented from local residents.

“Due to this, Director Huy expressed his reluctance to invest further in tourism facilities,” he said.

Therefore, the lasting impression that tourists have is the elephant riding tours. For years, these majestic animals have had to bear the weight of people on their backs.

The logo of this company features a powerful and friendly elephant in the region.

“However”, he said, “elephants in this area have been severely exploited.”

As elephants age, there is a growing fear that one day they will no longer exist. With the growing threats of poaching, habitat destruction, and human-wildlife conflict, it is becoming increasingly difficult for these majestic creatures to survive. Ultimately, this could lead to a future where there are no more elephants in the wild. It is up to us to take action and ensure that future generations will be able to experience the wonder of these animals.

Therefore, despite our reservations, we have ultimately decided to transition from riding the elephants to simply posing with them.

Very soon, we will construct traditional Lao-style houses to welcome the Tet holiday in April. Tourists will have an incredible opportunity to take memorable photos with both elephants and these traditional houses.

Also, we will design a tour that takes tourists from the Yok Don National Park to the Srepok Waterfall. Along the way, they will be able to experience the diverse cuisines of the Lao, H’Mong, and Ede ethnic groups. Furthermore, they will have the opportunity to view the ancient abode of Ama Kong, the renowned elephant hunter.

Elephant products, including ivory, have been officially banned in many countries due to their endangered status. This ban is an effort to protect these majestic animals and their habitats from the devastating effects of poaching and illegal trade. The ban also helps to ensure that these animals do not become extinct in the future. This ban is an important step in the right direction for the conservation of elephants and their habitats.

The availability of products made from elephants is now a distant memory, thanks to the recent enactment of stringent regulations. Rings crafted from the tail hair or tusks of these majestic creatures are now consigned to the past.

A lot of stores publicly advertised these products, though it was difficult to determine their authenticity.

Some elephant keepers even plucked the elephant’s tail hair to sell directly to tourists. This practice has been criticized, as it can cause the elephants considerable pain and distress.

According to the management of the tourist center, all the souvenir stores in the area have been mandated to cease the sale of elephant-based products, regardless of whether they are real or imitation.

The police forces and forest rangers regularly patrol the area, and any stores found in violation of this law are subject to hefty fines. “It’s serious business,” he said.

The abolition of elephant-derived products has helped to raise tourists’ awareness of protecting wildlife, including the elephants themselves.

Elephant races will no longer be featured at future coffee festivals, due to the increasing demand for animal welfare. The decision to remove elephant racing from coffee festivals comes after several organizations raised awareness of the potential abuse these animals may face. Animal welfare advocates are applauding the move, which they believe will help ensure that these majestic creatures are not subjected to any form of mistreatment.

This shift away from elephant racing is part of a larger trend towards protecting animals and promoting their welfare. Numerous organizations are working hard to ensure that animals are not exploited for entertainment or any other purpose. It is hoped that this will lead to a more compassionate and respectful attitude towards all creatures.

The removal of elephant racing from coffee festivals marks a major victory for animal rights activists and demonstrates that their voices are being heard. It is hoped that this change will inspire more people to take action in support of animal welfare and contribute to a more humane world.

Representatives of the 8th Coffee Festival of Buon Ma Thuot City in Dak Lak Province have affirmed that this year’s event, starting March 12th, will still be held as one of the 18 major annual events, but the elephants will not have to experience any health-damaging activities.

To make the content more engaging and interesting, we suggest adding some detail and context to the activities that will remain. For example, you could mention the type of race, such as a marathon or a relay race, or the rules for the football match. You could also provide more information about the tug of war with elephants, such as what type of rope is used, the size of the teams, or the prize for the winning team.

Instead of the usual activities, there will be other pro-elephant activities such as making offerings to the gods to pray for their well-being, having a make-up competition for elephants, hosting a buffet party, and organizing a posing competition.

The Elephant Festival at the Buon Don Tourist Center is part of an effort to honour the memorandum signed between the Dak Lak authorities and the Animals Asia Foundation (AAF), aimed at transitioning from riding elephants to more sustainable tourism practices.

The memorandum also stipulates that there will be no elephant parades taking place during the 8th Coffee Festival in the city of Buon Ma Thuot. This prohibition will ensure that the festival remains enjoyable and safe for all attendees. Furthermore, it is an important step in protecting the majestic animals and promoting their conservation.

The organizing committee will commission renowned international artists and performers, as well as expert coffee planters, to join in the remarkable performances instead of the endangered mammals.

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Since February 10, 2023, the Buon Don Tourist Center – located in Dak Lak Province in Vietnam’s Central Highlands and part of Simexco Daklak Ltd. – has substituted their much-in-demand elephant rides with a photoshoot in an effort to protect the remaining tamed population. This move is seen as a progressive step in the right direction, and one that could potentially preserve the elephants for generations to come.

This move, however, has elicited divergent reactions.

Le Van Toan, from Nghe An Province in north-central Vietnam, was visiting a relative when he travelled to Cu M’Gar District in Dak Lak Province. His visit was filled with joy and warmth as he was reunited with his beloved relative. He was able to take in the beauty of the area, as well as share stories and laughs with his family. It was a memorable trip that he was sure to never forget.

Taken to the Buon Don Tourist Center, he was expecting an exciting opportunity to ride an elephant.

Despite paying the VND40,000 (US$1.69) ticket price, he was dismayed to discover that the service had been discontinued.

According to the existing policy, tourists who have purchased admission to the Buon Don Tourist Center must purchase an additional ticket if they would like to take a photograph with the domesticated elephants.

“I came here to try riding the elephants, but I could have easily watched them elsewhere,” said Toan angrily.

Toan’s companions attempted to bargain with the tour guide, taking into account the extraordinary measures the man had taken to get his one chance to ride the enormous animal.

He traversed almost one thousand kilometers to reach here. If you want, we can pay more. All you have to do is make him sit on the elephant’s neck and capture a picture, suggested one of his friends.

“What an absurd service!” exclaimed the visitors. “We already paid the entrance ticket. Now you’re making us buy another one just to pose with the elephant?” They were incredulous and frustrated at the lack of understanding from the park staff.

Dung, the tour guide working at the Buon Don Tourist Center, gave her best effort to pacify the disgruntled visitors with comprehensive explanations.

According to her, the elephant rides were still available until February 10th, when they were officially brought to a close.

Unaware tourists often feel disappointed because they can’t take an elephant ride, she said.

According to an elephant keeper at the Buon Don Tourist Center, only a few photoshoot tickets are sold each day. This is likely due to the fact that it is a unique experience that requires a significant amount of time and effort to get the perfect shot. Furthermore, there is usually a waitlist for these tickets, as the demand for this activity is usually quite high. Therefore, if you are interested in taking part in this opportunity, it is best to book in advance to avoid disappointment.

As the owner earns a meager income, their elephants receive no additional food.

Every evening, I am compelled to tether my elephant in the forest, worried that it might damage people’s crops. Even more concerning is the potential for its tail or tusks being taken away,” he said.

I returned the elephant to the center before dawn, but it’s already 3:00 pm and I haven’t sold a single ticket yet.

United Efforts to Safeguard Elephants – Working together, we can ensure the future of the world’s beloved elephants. These majestic animals, whose numbers have dwindled drastically over the years, need our help and protection. By joining forces, we can help to conserve their habitats, stop poaching, and ensure that they have a safe and secure future. It is time for us to take action and ensure that these gentle giants are able to roam free in their natural habitats for generations to come.

Aware of the elephant owner’s disappointment, a group of Hanoian tourists offered to buy five tickets so that they could pose with his pet.

The 40-year-old mammal quickly devoured two packs of sugarcane sticks in a matter of minutes.

Three extra packs of sugarcane sticks were procured for him by one of these people. And everybody had fantastic shots with the friendly creature.

They took turns to pose with the elephant in order to prevent any potential irritation or aggression.

“Why are you eating so quickly?” exclaimed Hoa, a 60-year-old tourist, as she fed sugarcane sticks to the elephant. “Take it easy; there’s still more to eat! You must have been famished for days!”

The elephant was overjoyed by the kind and caring group of tourists, who presented it with sweet treats that it was eager to enjoy.

It was leaning forward and reaching out its trunk to fetch the snack.

Those who were lucky enough to witness the elephant’s majestic display of might against the azure sky were filled with elation and couldn’t help but erupt into laughter.

Le Duc Huy, the director of Simexco Daklak Ltd., acknowledges that riding elephants has been a long-standing tradition among Vietnamese tourists visiting the area. He recognizes that it has been a popular activity for many years, and continues to be one of the main attractions for visitors. Huy believes that it is important to respect the cultural heritage of the area, and to ensure that the elephants are treated with care and kindness. He is also committed to ensuring that safety measures are in place for both tourists and the elephants, and that the activity is conducted responsibly.

The greatest experience here has always been to hop atop an elephant and take home a delightful photograph as evidence. Nonetheless, if this practice persists, the elephants will eventually break down,” he remarked.

This needs to be changed.

According to him, this tourist destination is renowned for its heroic acts and historic legends, making it one of the most sought-after destinations for travelers.

It is also famous for its Buddhist monasteries and temples, such as the Wat Phu temple complex, a Unesco World Heritage site.

Occupied by ethnic Lao people since its very early stages, the land of Laos is full of mighty stories about hunting and taming elephants. It is famed for its Buddhist monasteries and temples, such as the Wat Phu temple complex, a UNESCO World Heritage site. This complex is a testament to the region’s long-standing culture and history, and it is now recognized internationally for its remarkable architecture and craftsmanship. Visitors to this area can experience the grandeur of its ancient structures and learn more about the religious and cultural traditions of the Lao people.

A group of tourists from central Vietnam showed their excitement as they switched from riding elephants to posing with them at the Buon Don Tourist Center. In the photo, they can be seen beaming with joy as they take a break from their ride and enjoy the scenery. The tourists’ enthusiasm is palpable, making this picture a perfect testament to the beauty of the Buon Don Tourist Center. A group of tourists from central Vietnam show excitement at the switch from riding elephants to posing with them at the Buon Don Tourist Center. Photo: Trung Tan / Tuoi Tre

A group of tourists from central Vietnam show excitement at the switch from riding elephants to posing with them at the Buon Don Tourist Center in Dak Lak Province. Photo: Trung Tan / Tuoi Tre

Besides the majestic Srepok River, which runs through Dak Lak Province and is a major tributary of the Mekong River, its banks are lined with various waterfalls and river islands, creating a tranquil and picturesque setting.

Tourists coming here can admire majestic old banyan trees with branches hanging like glistening hair reaching down to the sparkling water surface.

These alluring features make travelers from near and far want to explore what the destination has to offer.

Despite the Simexco Daklak Ltd.’s takeover of the Buon Don Tourist Center, certain challenges arose. These difficulties included a lack of infrastructure and resources, as well as an unfamiliarity with the area and its culture. To overcome these obstacles, the company implemented a number of strategies, such as hiring local staff to provide advice and support, investing in technology and infrastructure, and engaging in local community initiatives. In addition, the company also engaged in marketing campaigns to raise awareness of the tourist center and attract more visitors. As a result, the Buon Don Tourist Center has become a popular destination for both domestic and international travelers.

Noticeably, it is based on over hectares of farmland rented from local residents.

“Given this,” declared Director Huy, “we are very hesitant to invest in additional tourism facilities.”

Therefore, the lasting impression that lingers in the minds of tourists is that of elephant-riding tours. For years, these majestic creatures have been forced to bear the burden of carrying people on their backs.

The logo of this company features a powerful and friendly elephant in the region.

“However,” he said, “elephants in this area have been heavily exploited, leading to significant negative consequences.”

The elephant population is diminishing at an alarming rate. They are aging, and one day there may be no elephants left if we do not take action to protect them. We must act now to ensure the survival of these majestic creatures for future generations to enjoy.

Therefore, despite our reservations, we have ultimately decided to forgo riding the elephants and instead simply pose with them.

Very soon, we will construct traditional Lao-style houses to welcome their traditional Tet holiday in April. This is a great opportunity for tourists to take pictures with elephants and these new houses!

Also, we will design a tour that takes tourists from the Yok Don National Park to the Srepok waterfall. Along the way, they will get to enjoy the delicious dishes of the Lao, H’Mong, and Ede ethnic minorities, as well as witness the ancient house of Ama Kong – the renowned king of elephant hunters.

Elephants are beloved creatures, but due to their endangered status, many countries around the world have taken steps to protect them by banning the sale of products made from their tusks and hides. This includes everything from ivory carvings and trinkets to clothing and jewelry. The ban on trading in elephant products is an important part of protecting these amazing animals and ensuring their survival.

The availability of products crafted from elephant parts is now a distant memory, thanks to the recent implementation of a stringent ban. Rings made from an elephant’s tail hair and tusks can no longer be obtained.

A lot of stores openly boasted about these products, though it was difficult to verify their legitimacy.

Some elephant keepers even plucked the elephant’s hair tail in order to sell it directly to tourists.

According to the tourist center management, all souvenir stores in the area have been mandated to cease the sale of elephant-based products, both real and counterfeit.

The police forces and forest rangers regularly patrol the area, with stores that violate the law immediately facing hefty fines, he said.

The eradication of elephant-derived products has contributed to a heightened consciousness among tourists with regards to protecting wildlife, including the elephants themselves.

Elephant races are set to be a thing of the past, as they will no longer be included in future coffee festivals. This move has been met with both sadness and relief from animal rights activists, who have long argued that the practice of using elephants to race in such events is detrimental to their wellbeing. Despite this, the coffee industry has decided to take a stand and put an end to the practice, in hopes of promoting a more humane and ethical approach to animal welfare. This decision will undoubtedly have a major impact on coffee festivals across the globe, with the absence of elephant races sure to be felt.

Representatives of the 8th Coffee Festival of Buon Ma Thuot City in Dak Lak Province have affirmed that this year’s event, starting March 12th, will still be held as one of the 18 major annual events, but the elephants will not have to experience any health-damaging activities.

The content in English will be improved to include more exciting activities that will be sure to draw a crowd. For instance, races, swimming contests, football matches, and tug of war competitions with horses or humans as players will be included. Additionally, carnival games such as throwing darts at balloons, a dunk tank, and other interactive activities like face painting and balloon animals will be featured.

Instead of the usual pro-elephant activities, this year’s event will feature offerings to the gods in prayer for their well-being, a make-up contest for elephants, a delicious buffet party, and a posing competition for all to enjoy.

The Elephant Festival at the Buon Don Tourist Center is part of an effort to uphold the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed between the Dak Lak authorities and the Animals Asia Foundation (AAF). The agreement seeks to replace elephant riding with more sustainable tourism practices.

The memorandum further declares that no elephant parades will take place at the 8th Coffee Festival in Buon Ma Thuot City.

The organizing committee will commission renowned international artists and performers, as well as coffee planters, to partake in the performances instead of the endangered mammals. This will enable us to create a unique experience for the audience while ensuring the safety and well-being of the mammals.

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