Reporters from Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper embarked on an exciting journey to Thuan An Village, located near the picturesque Ban Than Cape, to uncover the two mysterious ancient wells. Guided by the locals, they trudged along a concrete path in the heart of Tam Hai Island to reach their destination.

On a pristine and uncluttered plot of land, the journalists beheld one of the two ancient wells, which, at first glance, barely seemed to differ from the wells of today.

The ten-meter deep well is constructed from sturdy bricks, with a circular entrance and a concrete wall.

However, locals report that there is a horizontal cave located down the well.

A woman is seen drawing water from an ancient well facing south Tam Hai Island Commune in Nui Thanh District of Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. The photo, taken by B.D., captures the age-old tradition of gathering water from wells and highlights the importance of water conservation in the region. The image is a reminder of the need to preserve such cultural practices and to ensure access to clean, safe water for all.

A woman draws water from an ancient well facing the southern part of Tam Hai Island Commune off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. Photo: B.D. / Tuoi Tre

There is another, smaller well located approximately 200 meters away in the opposite direction.

Locals refer to the two wells located in the area as the “North Well” and the “South Well”.

The two ancient wells are believed to have existed since settlers started populating Tam Hai, meaning they have been in use for hundreds of years.

The wells have provided an abundance of fresh water for the local population, who have consumed it without any form of treatment. Nevertheless, during the height of the dry season, these wells may become depleted.

The island lacks any alternative water supply system, and all of the recently-dug wells are contaminated with iron and salt.

Therefore, the two ancient wells are the primary source of water for over 8,000 Tam Hai islanders.

A man drinks fresh, clear water straight from an ancient well in Tam Hai Island Commune, off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. In the photo, taken by B.D. of Tuoi Tre, the man appears to be relieved and refreshed as he takes a sip of the life-giving water that has been around for centuries. The photo speaks to the importance of preserving such historic wells, which are often the only source of clean water for rural communities.

A man drinks water straight from an ancient well in Tam Hai Island Commune off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. Photo: B.D. / Tuoi Tre

The islanders have made considerable efforts to maintain and renovate the wells over multiple occasions.

Households located close to the wells can use them for free, while those living farther away must contribute VND1,000 (US$0.043) each time they draw water.

The collected amount of cash contributions will be utilized for the upkeep of the wells on an annual basis.

The majestic ancient wells of Tam Hai fishing commune, located near Ban Than Cape and surrounded by lush coconut groves, have become a prime tourist attraction in recent times. Tourists flock to the area to witness the grandeur of these wells, often praising their beauty and tranquility. Whether it’s to take in the stunning views or simply to relax in the tranquil atmosphere, these ancient wells are truly a sight to behold.

Visitors to the island can admire the closely-knit hamlets with winding pathways leading to residential areas, where the daily life of the locals remains uncomplicated and tranquil.

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Two decades-old wells have been the primary source of fresh water for generations of inhabitants of Tam Hai Island Commune in Nui Thanh District, Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. For years, these wells have been vital to the local community, providing them with essential sustenance.

Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper reporters followed a winding route from the center of Tam Hai to Thuan An Village, close to Ban Than Cape, a popular destination on the island, to uncover two ancient wells with the help of the locals.

On a pristine and uncluttered lot of land, the journalists beheld one of the two aged wells, which, upon first inspection, did not seem any different from modern ones.

It is approximately ten meters deep and is constructed of brick, with a round entrance and a concrete wall.

However, according to locals, there is a horizontal cave located deep down the well.

A woman is seen drawing water from an ancient well facing south Tam Hai Island Commune, off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. The stunning image of the woman was captured by B.D. and featured in Tuoi Tre’s news coverage. This unique well is a testament to the rich cultural heritage of Vietnam and its beautiful landscape.

A woman draws water from an ancient well facing the southern part of Tam Hai Island Commune off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. Photo: B.D. / Tuoi Tre

There is another, smaller well located approximately 200 meters away in the opposite direction.

Locals refer to the two wells in the area as the North Well and the South Well.

The two ancient wells in Tam Hai are believed to have been in use for hundreds of years, since the settlement of the area. This suggests that they have been around for a long time and have played a significant role in the history of the region.

The wells have provided abundant fresh water for the locals, who consume the resource directly without any treatment. However, these structures may become depleted during the height of the dry season.

The island currently does not have any other water supply system, while all of the newly-dug wells are contaminated with iron and salt. This has been a major issue for the residents of the island, as they have no access to safe drinking water. To address this situation, authorities have been looking into solutions that can provide a reliable, clean, and affordable water supply to the island’s population. They have considered desalination, importing water from other sources, and constructing filtration systems. However, these solutions come with a high price tag and require significant investment. Until a viable solution is found, the islanders will need to find ways to access clean drinking water.

Therefore, the two ancient wells are the main source of water for over 8,000 Tam Hai islanders.

A man drinks refreshing water straight from an ancient well in Tam Hai Island Commune, located off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. Captured in this remarkable image, the man appears to be savoring the unique taste of the water from the well, which is believed to be hundreds of years old. This stunning photograph taken by B.D. / Tuoi Tre is a reminder of the timeless beauty and wonder of Vietnam.

A man drinks water straight from an ancient well in Tam Hai Island Commune off Nui Thanh District in Quang Nam Province, central Vietnam. Photo: B.D. / Tuoi Tre

The islanders have made diligent efforts to maintain and renovate their wells on multiple occasions.

Households located close to the wells have the privilege of using them for free, while those that are farther away must pay VND1,000 (US$0.043) for each time they draw water.

The gathered sum of cash donations will be utilized for the upkeep of the wells on an annual basis.

The ancient wells of Tam Hai fishing commune have become a must-see destination for tourists visiting the area. Alongside other scenic spots, such as Ban Than Cape and lush coconut groves, these wells offer a unique insight into the culture and history of the commune. Recently, the area has seen a surge in popularity among travelers looking for a unique and unforgettable experience.

Visitors to the beautiful island can marvel at the quaint villages with narrow streets leading to residential areas, where the locals still live a tranquil and simple life.

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