The Museum of Ho Chi Minh City has partnered with the Ho Chi Minh City Antiquities Association to present an exhibition featuring a collection of unique and antique ceramic items. The exhibition, which will run until April 16, showcases 150 artifacts contributed by 21 collectors from across the country. Visitors can explore rare ceramics that date back centuries, including tea sets, pots, incense burners, statues, and more. One highlight is a pair of ceramic unicorns adorned with vibrant enamels, produced in the 20th century. This exhibition offers a journey through time and allows visitors to appreciate the rich heritage and cultural significance of Vietnamese ceramics.

A pair of ceramic unicorns inlaid with bright enamels produced in the 20th century is being showcased at an exhibition at the Museum of Ho Chi Minh City in District 1. Photo: Hoai Phuong / Tuoi Tre

The exhibition features ceramics from various periods and regions, including pieces from Ho Chi Minh City in the early 20th century. Collector Ho Hoang Tuan has contributed a collection of incense burners adorned with white and blue enamels, which he acquired from a household in Tien Giang Province. Collector Le Thanh Nghia has brought a tea set and a charming pipe bowl made in China between 1841 and 1847. Meanwhile, collector Pham Quoc Dinh has provided a pair of ceramic unicorns embellished with vibrant Vietnamese enamels and terracotta elephant statue seats dating back to the late 19th century.

A set of incense burners is on display at an exhibition at the Museum of Ho Chi Minh City in District 1. Photo: Hoai Phuong / Tuoi Tre

A statue of ceramic crafted at the end of the 19th century. Photo: Hoai Phuong / Tuoi Tre

Doan Thi Trang (R), deputy head of the Museum of Ho Chi Minh City, receives a ceramic exhibit from a veteran. Photo: Hoai Phuong / Tuoi Tre

According to Le Thanh Nghia, chairman of the Ho Chi Minh City Antiquities Association, these antiquities are made of various ceramic materials and originate from Vietnam, China, Japan, and France. The majority of the pieces on display are Vietnamese porcelain objects from the Ly, Tran, Le, and Nguyen dynasties, which span from the 11th century to the mid-20th century. The exhibition aims to provide antique enthusiasts with a glimpse into Vietnamese history and culture, offering a valuable learning experience for visitors.